Creative is an important part of any email campaign. Creative refers to the copy and design of your email — in other words, what it says and how it looks. While the copywriter and designer are responsible for these, the ultimate responsibility lies with the marketing manager or other person in charge of the campaign.

You can’t expect the copywriter and designer to develop great creative unless the marketing manager has provided a clear blueprint outlining business goals, supporting documentation, and his or her “vision” for the email message. Too many companies don’t understand this. The old garbage-in, garbage-out adage applies here. Read More →

Earlier this month, I led a webinar for the Specialized Information Publishers Association (SIPA). One of topics we discussed was boosting opt-in email list growth. Here are some tips that you can use to acquire new subscribers, no matter what industry you’re in. The key metric we focused on is acquisition conversion rate. Read More →

What can marketers gain from collecting and integrating touchpoint data into the CRM system?

Back in 2015 Gartner reported that organizations worldwide spent $27.5 billion on customer relationship management (CRM). This was expected to increase to $37 billion in 2017. But are companies getting a decent return on this large investment?

And more importantly, is your organization using its CRM system to optimize bottom line revenue? Read More →

Note from Jeanne: Happy Throwback Thursday! A year ago LinkedIn made some big changes which drove me to write this article which was first published by ClickZ in August 2015. Whether or not it worked for them it raised some good questions about send frequency– here are some of those questions, along with my suggestions for how to find answers specific to your own email audience. Enjoy! 

Did you notice?

Last week LinkedIn announced some big changes to its email program: they decreased their send quantities – dramatically. For every 10 emails they used to send, they now send only six. That’s a 40 percent decrease.

Most of my colleagues didn’t notice the difference. But I did. My morning email from LinkedIn, the one I read religiously every day along with theSkimm, disappeared. I was wondering what happened to it. That said, I am sure there are other email messages from LinkedIn which have disappeared that I’m not missing.

LinkedIn says they made the change because of customer feedback – and jokes on late night talk shows. They are happy with the results; complaints have been cut in half since they made the change.

Frequency is one of the biggest challenges facing email marketers today. Whether you’re considering sending less, like LinkedIn did, or increasing your send quantities, here are some things to consider. Read More →

From time to time I’ll pull a message from my inbox and do a walk-through of its pros and cons. These gentle critiques are intended to educate; I hope that the companies mentioned as well as readers will keep that top of mind. 

This is the tale of three email messages, sent over the course of four months from the same organization. As with any great story, there are high points and low points to this tale — read and score it yourself, decide whether the positives outweigh the negatives. This organization is certainly trying and making progress, but are they succeeding?

The email I received yesterday, the last of the three, follows. Read it quickly, gather your thoughts, then read my thoughts below. Read More →

In case you missed it, now both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have ’email issues.’ Here’s a bring overview of the latter situation along with some tips for avoiding the rookie mistakes made by the Trump Campaign.

Mr. Trump’s problems are a little different from Mrs. Clinton’s — his revolve around deliverability caused by a gap in some basic email knowledge within his organization and/or its consultants. In a nutshell:

According to Return Path, 79% of the email messages sent by Paramount Communication Group on behalf of the Trump campaign were not delivered to the inbox. As a result of this and the spam complaints generated by the send Adestra, Paramount’s email service provider, suspended their account.

There were a number of things the campaign did that contributed to the deliverability issues. It appears that they did not warm up their IP addressess — it also appears that they purchased an email list that wasn’t well targeted.

Let’s talk in detail about the second one.  Read More →

Note from Jeanne: Happy Throwback Thursday! This was one of the most popular columns that ClickZ published last year. Although it was written in February 2015 the facts and opinions expressed here are still 100% on target. Enjoy!

It’s been a long time since the phrase “double opt-in” has crossed my lips, but it came up in not just one but two different conversations in the past few weeks. Both were friends that work in the digital marketing and product development world and they’re really good at what they do. But email isn’t their primary wheelhouse, like it is mine.

So it was interesting that both considered double opt-in the way that email marketing acquisition should be done. One reminded me that, back when we worked together in 2000, I was a very strong proponent of double opt-in. That’s true; but I’ve changed my stance. While I’m not anti-double-opt-in (full disclosure: my email newsletter is and always has been double opt-in, read on to learn why), there are times when it makes sense to go double opt-in and other times when single opt-in is just fine.

So why did my stance change and how do I determine whether to recommend single or double opt-in to a client?

Read More →

Earlier this month I re-published an article from last year about a great opt-in campaign executed by T.j.Maxx to entice email subscribers to sign-up for an additional email publication. I loved it because they went for the opt-in — they didn’t just assume that all their current subscribers would want additional content.

I was reminded just how unusual this is last weekend, when I received an email from another brand offering me additional content and more email messages from them. But this one is a negative option opt-out, rather than an opt-in. When you do a negative option opt-out, you assume that silence (no response) equals permission.

Here’s the email message: Read More →